A3@M2 #6 – LETTERS TO THE NEXT GENERATION

Aim

  • To make children evaluate the Curriculum they were involved in
  • To write down what they have learned and what they think they can use in their life

Source of the activity

Contributed by Ildikó Lázár (TASKs for democracy)

Type of activity

Discussion, writing, peer reading

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Openness to cultural otherness
  • Tolerance of ambiguity
  • Empathy
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self

Overview

Children review their experiences and write a letter to the next generation of students

Materials

  • A blank A4 sheet for each pair of participants
  • Pictures or cards cut into two for pairing

Group size

Work in pairs

Time needed

45 minutes

Preparation

  • Think about the evaluation criteria you would like your participants to keep in mind as they write their letters

Step-by-step instructions

  • Explain why it is important to review what has been done and discussed in the previous activities or sessions. Tell children that their evaluation will take the form of a letter to the next set of participants.
  • Children form pairs or you pair them up randomly with pictures or cards with expressions on them cut into two. The two halves have to find each other in order to form a whole and complement each other. If you have an odd number of children, it is better to have a group of three rather than to have someone work alone.
  • You may provide a few ideas on what to write about and how to organize the writing into a letter. Project the relevant bullet points or write them on the board. For example:
    • aims of the activity/session/course
    • atmosphere
    • content
    • understanding of terminology
    • activities and assignments
    • timing and pacing
    • achieved learning outcomes
    • Children’s evaluation of their own progress, effort and commitment
    • Children’s plans for using the knowledge, skills and attitudes that have been developed
    • Children’s plans for using concrete activities or materials
    • problems, risks, dangers
    • general advice for future children
  • Children discuss their ideas in pairs and write their letters together to the next set of children so that they know what to expect.
  • When the time is up, the letters are passed around. If possible, everybody reads everybody else’s letters.
  • Everybody should take notes to be able to quote one or two interesting points from some of the letters.

Debriefing and Evaluation

  • A discussion follows with questions for clarification, and suggestions for action and/or improvement based on the bullet points on the board and the quotes you and children want to read out from some of the letters.
  • Make your criteria for evaluating their comments very clear and explicit.
  • Letters should be pinned to a board for future children to read and later they can actually be used as an introductory activity with the next group of children.

Tips for the teacher

  • Warn children that they can use their sense of humour but they should write letters that truly reflect their evaluation of the session and of their own learning.
  • In addition, perhaps it is useful to remind them that this should not turn into a round of compliments but into the kind of letter we all expect to receive from a critical but supportive friend or colleague.

A3@M2 #5 – ADVERTISING CHILDREN’S VOICES

Let’s tell the world about our town!

Aim

  • To develop critical thinking skills about advertising and the media
  • To practice creativity and communications skills
  • To develop ideas on how to promote children’s human rights
  • To deepen understanding about human rights

Source of the activity

Derived from “COMPASITO”

Type of activity

Storytelling, drawing, writing

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Openness to cultural otherness
  • Self-efficacy
  • Civic mindedness
  • Autonomous learning skills
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills
  • Skills of listening and observing
  • Linguistic, communicative and plurilingual skills
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of language and communication
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Children develop a TV advertisement for children’s intervention of regeneration intervention in the town/district

Materials

  • Paper and art supplies

Group size

1 class

Time needed

120-180 minutes

Preparation

  • If possible, arrange video equipment to record the advertisements

Step-by-step instructions

  • Divide children into groups of three or four. Explain that their group has been asked to advertise their intervention of regeneration at school. They will make an advertisement for television that lasts from one to three minutes that makes people aware of and/or understand that work.
  • Ask children to describe some advertisements on TV that have caught their attention. Brainstorm features of good advertisements (e.g. clever phrases, sound effects, music, humour, serious message).
  • Discuss the audience for their advertisement. Is it aimed at children, parents, teachers, the general public or all of these? Discuss ways in which the advertisement can be made attractive to their chosen audience.
  • Explain that each group should choose an aspect of the intervention they want to advertise and the audience(s) they want to address. Ask someone from each group to report their right to you, and what audience they have decided upon.
  • Once groups have chosen the work, they should develop an idea to advertise it. Encourage them to consider many different ways to present the work (e.g. a story that they act out, a song they sing, a cartoon for which they draw the storyboard). Remind them that this will be a video for TV so it should be visually interesting and have action, not just ‘talking heads’. It should not be too complex to be presented in less than three minutes.
  • Circulate among the groups to monitor their progress. Once a group has completed its advertisement, ask them to give it a title and begin to practice.
  • When all the groups have planned their advertisements, bring the whole group together to share their ideas and get feedback from others. Ask each group to explain their work, their audience, and their ideas. If they are ready, they may try to perform it as well. After each description or performance, encourage constructive suggestions and feedback, asking questions such as:
    • Will this idea appeal to the chosen audience?
    • Will it get the idea of the work across clearly?
    • Do you like about these ideas?
    • Can you offer any suggestions for improvement?
  • Give the groups time to improve and practice their advertisements.
  • Ask each group to present their advertisement and plans to each other.

Debriefing and Evaluation

  • Debrief the activity, asking questions such as:
    • Were any parts of this activity especially challenging? Especially fun?
    • Did you learn something about how advertisements are made?
    • Was it hard to think in images rather than just words?
    • Was it hard to think about how to reach a particular audience?
    • Are advertisements always positive? Why or why not?
    • What did you learn from the other storyboards?
    • Will this activity change the way you look at TV?
  • Relate the activity to human rights, asking questions such as:
    • Why did your group choose that particular aspect of the activity?
    • Why did your group choose that particular aspect of the activity?
    • What kind of reaction or action do you think your advertisement would produce?
    • Is a TV advertisement a good way to send people a message about your regeneration activity? Why or why not?
    • Did your advertisement involve other issues besides the one you focused on?
    • Who needs education about children’s human rights?

Tips for the teacher

  • This is a complex activity that may challenge children to use new skills (e.g. writing dialogue or songs, developing a story board). The teacher needs to monitor the children’s progress carefully, helping them keep on track.
  • Some groups will move faster through the process than other. If a group has completed one task, give them instructions individually for the next step. Give them plenty to time to practice and to revise after feedback.
  • Use the activity to encourage critical thinking about advertising and its purposes.
  • Use the activity to practice giving and receiving constructive criticism.

A3@M2 #4 – AT HOME IN EUROPE – Lesson 4

Europeans are different and equal
What we have in common and what not

Aim

  • • To understand that Europe has a variety of characteristics.
  • • To reflect upon the fact that Europeans have got some things in common but are also very different from each other

Source of the activity

Derived from “Growing up in democracy”

Type of activity

Plenary discussion, group work.

Pair and group work.

  • Empathy
  • Civic mindedness
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills
  • Tolerance of ambiguity
  • Skills of listening and observing
  • Respect
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world
  • Openness to cultural otherness
  • Valuing cultural diversity
  • Linguistic, communicative and plurilingual skills

Overview

The students look at the photo of the physical map. The teacher engages them in a discussion about similarities and differences in a) a geographical context, and b) a social context. The students discuss the social differences in Europe and try to find solutions for dialogue and mutual understanding

Materials

  • Photo of the physical map, country portraits, blackboard or flipchart, slips of paper.

Group size

1 class

Time needed

Preparation

None

Step-by-step instructions

  • The students sit in a circle.
  • The teacher presents the photos that were taken of the physical map.
  • The students should use different materials, such as textiles, paper, etc., to lay out the rivers and landforms.
  • It is the students’ task to look at the photos and think about the similarities and differences on the map. They should try to answer questions such as:
    • Which parts of Europe have high mountains?
    • Where are the longest rivers?
    • Which countries have similar landforms?
    • In which countries do people speak the same language?
    • Which countries share a sea?
  • They use their country portraits in order to gather information.
  • They present their country in the form of a presentation or in the form of a performance.
  • As a second step, the teacher introduces another set of questions to start a new discussion. Apart from natural and geographical similarities and differences, there are other differences in Europe, such as social differences or phenomena like prejudice.
  • The teacher motivates the students to voice their thoughts about the social differences in Europe by raising questions such as:
    • Are there rich and poor countries in Europe? Which are rich? Which are poor?
    • Is life more difficult in some European countries than in others? Why?
    • Why do many people leave their country to live somewhere else? What are the reasons for this?
  • After having collected the students’ thoughts about these non-geographical differences and similarities, the students should sit together in groups of four and come up with ideas on how to create an understanding of these social differences in Europe without denying national identities, thereby fostering intercultural dialogue.
  • They write down their ideas on little slips of paper and present their ideas in front of the class.
  • Then they stick the slips of paper next to the photos of the physical map (this helps with visualisation).

Debriefing and Evaluation

Debrief the activity with “The telegraph”.

Tips for the teacher

(Collecting suggestions from the Core Teachers)

A3@M2 #4 – AT HOME IN EUROPE – Lesson 3

I am at home in Europe (building a physical map II)
Rivers, mountains and landforms in Europe

Aim

  • To become aware of all the different characteristics of Europe as a continent.
  • To grasp the concept of spatial relationships by seeing where they come from.

Source of the activity

Derived from “Growing up in democracy”

Type of activity

Individual work, plenary discussion

Pair and group work.

  • Civic mindedness
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills
  • Tolerance of ambiguity
  • Skills of listening and observing
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

After having laid out the borders and countries, the students continue with characteristics of landforms. They lay out rivers, mountainsand other important things on the physical map. At the end a photo is taken of the physical map

Materials

  • Printed copies of the map of Europe as templates, blue material for laying out rivers (paper, textiles, etc.), coloured material for laying out mountains and landforms (paper, textiles, etc.), atlas, camera

Group size

1 class

Time needed

Preparation

None

Step-by-step instructions

  • After having laid out the country borders and marked the capital cities and flags, the students continue to work on the rivers and landforms. Not all students will be busy as not all countries will have major rivers and landforms.
  • The teacher might possibly wish to assign these students to new groups or to assign students who have already finished with their country to another group.
  • The students should use different materials, such as textiles, paper, etc., to lay out the rivers and landforms.
  • The students can also add other things to the physical map, but this should be voluntary.
  • The students should decide whether or not to do this; it also depends on the information they collected during their country research (on food, famous people, etc.).
  • When the physical map is finished, photos are taken. Ideally, the map should be photographed twice – once with the students standing in “their” countries and once without the students, so that all the landforms, rivers, etc., can be clearly seen.

Debriefing and Evaluation

Debrief the activity with “The telegraph”.

Tips for the teacher

(Collecting suggestions from the Core Teachers)

A3@M2 #4 – AT HOME IN EUROPE – Lesson 2

I am at home in Europe (Building a physical map I)

Aim

  • • To develop a feeling for distance and looseness
  • • To respect each other

Source of the activity

Derived from “Growing up in democracy”

Type of activity

Pair and group work

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Civic mindedness
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills
  • Tolerance of ambiguity
  • Skills of listening and observing
  • Respect
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

The students build a map of Europe in the playground of their school. They work in pairs on two countries they did research on.
They start off with laying out the countries and borders. They indicate where they come from.

Materials

  • Printed copies of the map of Europe as templates, country portraits, coloured paper, atlas

Group size

1 class

Time needed

Preparation

Step-by-step instructions

  • The students work in pairs on the two countries they have done research on at home (the task received at the end of lesson 1). They bring to the lesson the country portraits and all the information they have collected about their countries. They also bring their maps of Europe.
  • The whole class gathers in the school playground.
  • The teacher instructs the students to build a physical map of Europe using the different kinds of material available.
  • Two students work on each country.
  • The teacher sets the framework of the map by defining the area in which the students can work.
  • Next, the students start laying out the borders of the countries. They have to make sure that the right countries are next to each other.
  • Then they can indicate the capital cities and the flags on the layout.
  • Having done this, every student should stand in his/her country and begin a dialogue with the student in the neighbouring country.
  • They should exchange information about each other’s countries. Invisible barriers might arise, such as having to speak a foreign language.
  • As a result of the country portrait that every student has filled in, it should be possible for each student to exchange a few words with one another in “their” country’s language.
  • The rest of the dialogue can take place in their mother tongue.
  • The students should try to have as many dialogues as possible with their classmates in neighbouring countries.

Debriefing and Evaluation

Debrief the activity with “The telegraph”.

Tips for the teacher

The term “physical map” is used in two different senses. Firstly, a physical map in the context of cartography describes a map which shows identifiable landmarks such as mountains, rivers, lakes, oceans and other permanent geographic features. Secondly, the term physical map is also used in the context of genetics, where it describes how much DNA separates two genes and is measured in base pairs, as opposed to a genetic map.

In the context of this series of lessons about Europe we use the term “physical map” in the cartographic sense but also in a very active sense – with the students “acting out” the maps themselves.

Only by doing so can the difficult spatial relationships, the concept of borders, the length of rivers and the height of mountains be grasped by students at primary level. This also helps students to understand the social aspects of living together on the European continent. By actually building and then “standing in” the countries, the students can physically perceive their neighbours and can understand boundaries and barriers such as foreign languages, culture and other country related differences more easily. The concept of building a physical map ties in to aspects of learning by doing and concrete experiences.

A3@M2 #4 – AT HOME IN EUROPE – Lesson 1

What I know about Europe

Aim

  • To re-activate their knowledge about Europe
  • To discover their view of the continent

Source of the activity

Derived from “Growing up in democracy”

Type of activity

Individual work, plenary discussion

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Civic mindedness
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills
  • Skills of listening and observing
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Children work with a map of Europe. They indicate where they come from, they write down what cities they know, which countries are familiar to them, and which flags and other important things they know, etc.

Materials

  • Printed copies of the map of Europe, country portraits, pens, glue, scissors, atlas, books, Internet (if possible).

Group size

1 class

Time needed

Preparation

Step-by-step instructions

  • The students are given a printed copy of a blank map of Europe (ideally enlarged to A3 size). Their task is to re-activate what they know about Europe.
  • They start to work on the different questions listed underneath the map.
  • The teacher then presents the information pack in the students’ handout section (countries and capitals, flags, rivers, mountains and landforms).
  • The students will work with this material but can also collect information using other resources, as far as these are available in the classroom (Internet, atlas, books, etc.).
  • The finished maps of Europe are displayed on the wall. As homework, the students chose one European country to do research on at home. They fill in the “Country portrait” up to lesson 2. They also find a partner who they can work with in the following lessons and who ideally chose a neighbouring country to theirs.

Debriefing and Evaluation

Debrief the activity with “The telegraph”.

Tips for the teacher

(Collecting suggestions from the Core Teachers)

A3@M2 #4 – AT HOME IN EUROPE

Background information for teachers: what traces of Europe are present in students’ daily life

Students at primary level have a different perception of time and spatial relationships than adults. Therefore, when tackling Europe as a topic at primary school level, it is essential to find age-adequate touching points where a didactical concept of European learning can be developed. Concepts of space and relations are different to those of students at secondary level. The students’ prior knowledge, their current attitudes towards Europe and their interests, as well as different ways for them to gather information, should be reflected on by the teacher beforehand. How can primary school students learn about Europe? Not forgetting one of the key EDC/HRE questions relating to Europe: what is European identity? EDC/HRE is not a national concept. It is a concept that deals with the question of how people live together in different settings: in terms of family, neighbourhood, class, school, region, country, and in terms of Europe.

When looking at the reality of students’ lives, it becomes evident that nowadays primary school students grow up with an international and therefore also a European dimension to their daily life.

Students experience this in terms of internationality, multiculturalism and multilingualism in various contexts:

  • through living together with children from different nations and cultures (in kindergarten, at school, in the area in which they live);
  • through international products;
  • through European and international references in media used by the students (books, magazines, television, CDs, the Internet, etc.);
  • through travelling.

Most of these contexts are taken for granted by students from an early age and are perceived unconsciously. For example, students are not conscious of the origins of foods such as spaghetti, pizza and croissants, as they have not actively experienced the slow process of integration of consumer goods within Europe. At the same time, stereotypes and simplified viewpoints of various parts of our continent are constantly appearing in the media. For students, these stereotypes can become prior “knowledge” about Europe that has somehow been “endorsed”. In reality, these are attitudes or subjective beliefs rather than knowledge.

Thus, primary school students cannot be viewed as a tabula rasa when talking about Europe. What teaching about Europe can add is the dimension of sorting, systematising, expanding and objectifying any prior knowledge. Teaching and learning should therefore aim at reflecting present stereotypes, prejudices and opinions, as well as at focusing on raising awareness of a multicultural, multilingual and in itself diverse but equal European society.

In comparison to the secondary level, teaching and learning about Europe in primary school has to be experienced and lived actively. Teaching needs to encompass a very open-minded approach, which leans towards two disciplinary dimensions – the objective–neutral and the ideal – and which uses very concrete examples from students’ daily lives. For this age group, real communication and friendship are the central didactical dimensions for teaching and learning. Where the group includes students with a migration background, this could be used as one of the starting points for teaching and learning about Europe and its people.

This activity is articulated in 4 lessons:

A3@M2 #3 – CVS REPORTER

Aim

  • To create a reportage about children’s exploration of the town/district spaces and memories
  • To develop collaborative skills for active participation

Source of the activity

Derived from “COMPASITO”

Type of activity

Photo reportage or other forms of reporting

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Respect
  • Civic mindedness
  • Responsibility
  • Self-efficacy
  • Autonomous learning skills
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills
  • Linguistic, communicative and plurilingual skills
  • Co-operation skills
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of language and communication
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Children report on their town/district (in its space-time dimensions) and its community

Materials

  • One digital or Polaroid-type camera for each group
  • Note pads and pens to take notes and identify pictures
  • Copies of maps of the community
  • Optional: Printer for printing digital photographs

Group size

1 class

Time needed

90-120 minutes
To assign before Christmas holidays and to discuss upon return from vacation, at school

Preparation

  • Make copies of maps of the school

Step-by-step instructions

  • Discuss with children what reporters do, both in print media and TV. Explain that they themselves are going become photo reporters and take pictures of the town and its community, and interview parents, grandparents, other children about their experience with the town/district.
  • Divide the children into groups of three or four. Give each group a camera and a specific assignment. For example:
    • Group A might check on safety conditions.
    • Group B might check on public parks.
    • Group C might check on “children safe” areas.
    • Group D could concentrate on interviews to grandparents, elders, or neighbors.
  • Give the groups time to discuss their topic and plan how they will look for evidence. Make sure they know whom to contact to be able to enter certain areas (e.g. caretaker for park). They should all know how to use the camera. Each group should also have at least one child who will take notes and write up captions to identify the photographs, one to relate the photo to specific isues of the town/district and another who will write up their suggestions for responses.
  • Ask each group to report on their plans to the whole group. Set a specific deadline for completing their reporting assignments.
  • After groups have taken their photos, give them time to prepare a mini exhibition that will take place during the final public event. Every exhibition should include:
    • A title
    • The names of the children in the group
    • Captions for each picture, stating when and where it was taken and what it shows
    • Comments on the town/district and its community
    • Recommendations for addressing the violations observed and commendations for good examples.

Debriefing and Evaluation

  • Debrief the activity by asking questions such as these:
    • How did you like being a reporter?
    • Was it difficult to find the examples you needed?
    • Was it difficult to ‘catch’ the situation in a photograph?
    • Was it difficult to write the captions?
    • Was it difficult to make commendations? Recommendations?
    • Did you learn anything about your community? About yourself? Did you see anything in a new way?
    • Can a camera be a useful tool to reveal situations? Can writing be useful?
    • Can you think of other tools that could reveal these situations?
    • What, if anything, does a picture add to something that is written?
  • Relate the activity to school by asking questions such as:
    • What did you learn about your town/district and its community?
    • What were some positive examples in the town?
    • What were some negative examples in the town?
    • Can we make concrete suggestions for improving human rights? To whom (e.g. school administration, parents, mayor, local council, media, teacher)?
    • The CRC guarantees children the right to express their views freely in all matters affecting them. Do you use this right? If yes, how? How could you use it most effectively? What skills do you need to do that?

Tips for the teacher

  • Emphasize that this reporting is not just to find some problems in the town/district but also to evaluate what is going well.
  • Stress the importance of recognizing and commending those who are protecting and providing good health, safety and environmental standards.
  • You may need to give children basic instruction on operating a camera and tips on how to take good photographs. Be sure that all children learn how to use the camera and have an opportunity to use it.

A3@M2 #2 – WHAT A WONDERFUL WORLD

Aim

  • To discuss the concrete and abstract factors of the environment
  • To evaluate our own and others’ environment
  • To discuss ways to protect and/or change their own environment and that of others

Source of the activity

Derived from “COMPASITO”

Type of activity

Stating preferences, discussion

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Valuing cultural diversity
  • Openness to cultural otherness and to other beliefs, world views and practices
  • Civic-mindedness
  • Responsibility
  • Analytical and critical thinking
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Children draw contrasting pictures of environments where they would or would not want to live. They discuss what factors make the differences and how to influence their own environment

Materials

  • Paper
  • Colouring materials, e.g. paints, markers, crayons, pencils
  • Drawing pins or sticky tape to hang drawings

Group size

1-20

Time needed

50 minutes

Preparation

  • Gather colouring materials
  • Copy the handout for each child

Step-by-step instructions

  • Lay out colours of every kind. Ask the children to think about an environment they would like to have – real or imaginary – and to draw it.
  • Then ask the children to think about an environment they would not like to have, and to draw it.
  • When the drawings are finished, hang them and invite the children to view the mini-exhibition

Debriefing and Evaluation

  • Debrief the activity, asking questions such as these:
    • Was it easy to think of the two different environments?
    • Which drawing and environment do you like the most? Why?
    • Which drawing and environment do you like the least? Why?
    • If there were people living in the environments you have drawn, how do they feel?
    • Which picture matches your real environment?
  • Relate the activity to human rights, asking questions such as these:
    • The environment is more than just the physical space. What other factors make up a positive or negative environment? Think of factors such as opportunities, non-violence, non-discrimination, freedom and human rights.
    • How does our physical environment affect us? How does our rights environment affect us?
    • How would you describe the rights environment where you live?
    • What would you like to change about your physical environment? Your rights environment?
    • What could you do to make your environment more like the one you drew?
    • Do all the children in the world have an environment they like?
    • Do we have a human right to a good environment?
    • Do you think we should have a right to good environment?
    • What can we do to promote a good environment for all the children in the world?

Tips for the teacher

  • Help children understand that ‘environment’ is created by both concrete, physical factors as well as abstract ones, such as the degree of rights and freedoms. Emphasize that we need both factors for a good environment. Younger children may have difficulty grasping the abstract concept of environment.
  • Before doing the exercise, be clear on which aspects of environment you want to focus. Addressing the entire ‘environment’ without a clear focus will be too large and abstract.

A3@M2 #1 – MIRROR, SPEAK TO ME

Aim

  • To energize and help develop self-esteem and empathy as well as good relations among children

Source of the activity

Contributed by Katica Pevec Semec (TASKs for democracy)

Type of activity

Writing and some movements

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Openness to cultural otherness
  • Respect
  • Empathy
  • Conflict-resolution skills
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self

Overview

Children write positive adjectives or statements about every classmate

Materials

  • Sheets of paper with the drawing of a mirror

Group size

whole class

Time needed

20 minutes

Preparation

  • Ideally, the room should be set up so the group can sit in a circle

Step-by-step instructions

  • Have the whole group sit down in a circle. Distribute a sheet with a mirror drawn on it to each child. Ask children to write their name on the frame or handle of the mirror.
  • Each member of the group passes his/her mirror to the child sitting on his/her right in the circle, and collects one from his/her neighbour on the left.
  • Everyone writes one or two positive comments about the child whose mirror it is on the sheet they have received (e.g. the achievements, positive work, and other pleasant and interesting things about the individual, using words, phrases, sentences, etc.).
  • Children pass the mirror they have just commented on to the classmate on their right.
  • Continue for as many rounds as you have time for but at least until half the group has written comments on each mirror.
  • When all (or enough) people have commented, ask children to stop and retrieve their own mirrors.
  • Allow them enough time to read the comments and then conduct a short debriefing session based on some of the following questions:
    • How did you feel during the activity?
    • What were the easy and challenging parts of this activity? Why?
    • How did you feel when writing something positive about another classmate?
    • How did you feel when you read positive things about yourself?

Tips for the teacher

  • Make the drawing of the mirror large enough for several children to write comments.
  • Be ready to provide examples of the kind of positive comments children can make.

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.