A3@M1 #6 – BEING IN SOMEONE ELSE’S MOCCASINS

Aim

  • To help children experience exclusion through role play
  • To promote discussion about positive and negative feelings
  • To develop empathy and multiple perspectives

Source of the activity

Contributed by Hilal Akyüz (TASKs for democracy)

Type of activity

Discussion, role playing

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Valuing human dignity and human rights
  • Valuing cultural diversity
  • Openness to cultural otherness
  • Tolerance of ambiguity
  • Empathy
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Students discuss about some everyday situations and act them for discovering a solution

Materials

  • One copy of the quiz sheet and pencil per person
  • Slips of paper

Group size

3 groups of children

Time needed

80 minutes

Preparation

  • Photocopy and cut out the right number of role cards. Arrange the classroom to have enough space for acting out roles (it is necessary using 2 classrooms if one is too small)

Step-by-step instructions

  • Tell your teachers briefly that in the next session they will act out and discuss everyday situations
  • Divide teachers into 3 groups, following the roles of the situation in the task
  • Before you give out the role cards, tell your participants that they have to act out and solve the situations on the role cards, and that everyone in their group should get a chance to act.
  • Participants are given about 30 minutes to discuss the situation, find a solution and allocate a role to every member of the group.
  • You can record the role play or take pictures, which you can use for further activities or debriefing and reflecting.
  • After having finished Steps 1 and 2 you can start reflecting by asking participants to tell the whole class about their thoughts and feelings about the situations. You may want to use some of the following questions.
    • What was difficult to act out, which role was annoying, funny, etc.?
    • What did the situation remind you of? Are there any similar situations in your society/surroundings/ school?
    • Ask participants if they can use these role plays in a language class, in a democratic citizenship class, etc. What would they change to suit their pupils’ needs and interests better?
    • Ask your participants to complete the following sentences (quiz) individually and assure them that their papers will be treated confidentially:
      • Before we talked about diversity today, I had not been aware of the following
        …………………………………………..
      • During the training I remembered an event where I felt different/excluded
        …………………………………………..
      • Having attended this session, I feel that there is a need to deal with diversity in school/no need to deal with diversity because
        …………………………………………..
      • If I have the chance to apply some of these role play in my classroom, I will try out the following activities
        …………………………………………..
        because
        …………………………………………..
      • Further comments you would like to add
        …………………………………………..

Tips for the facilitator

  • In Step 3, allow teachers time to remember and reflect as it takes time to recall and talk about past experiences, but do not force participants to share possibly unpleasant experiences
  • For classroom implementation do not limit yourself to the materials suggested here; you can explore the same topic using other relevant situations, sketches, etc.

SITUATION

Instructions and materials

All you need is a piece of paper for the child with role C, indicating that s/he is the police woman/man.

  1. Choose children for role A and send them out of the classroom.
  2. Read out the situation to the classroom. Everyone can make up the language that will be used to represent the community the role A students encounter in the town.
  3. Choose a child to be the policewoman/man and give her/him the role card.
  4. Invite the role A children back into the classroom.
  5. The whole class tries to avoid contact with the migrant family represented by role A.
  6. The climax role enters the class and s/he is allowed to make her/his final explanation in the real classroom language.
  7. See how they solve the situation.

SITUATION

There is suddenly a new family in your happy, clean and friendly town, speaking a language you do not understand. The whole town rejects contact with the family that speaks a language that they cannot understand.

Role A (3 to 4 children)
There is a war in your country and you have to flee with your family to another country. You walk in the streets and parks and try to talk to people to explain your situation. You are hungry and tired. But no one speaks your language. Try to explain to them that you are ready to work in order to get food and a warm place to sleep.
Role B (whole class)
The whole class has to speak a nonsense language, and pretend not to understand English (or the language usually spoken in the class). Try to avoid contact with the family. Finally, two of you go to the police woman/man to complain about the family, stating that their presence is not wanted in your town.
Role C (climax role)
You are a policewoman/man; citizens come to you and complain about a new family that is walking around in the parks and streets of your town. You do not like them either. But you try to understand them as you know a little bit of their language. You understand that they fled from war in their country, and that the father was a famous scientist in that country. You explain this situation to the whole group and observe their reaction. (Make the explanation in the real classroom language).

A3@M1 #8 – LETTERS TO THE NEXT GENERATION

Aim

  • To make children evaluate the Curriculum they were involved in
  • To write down what they have learned and what they think they can use in their life

Source of the activity

Contributed by Ildikó Lázár (TASKs for democracy)

Type of activity

Discussion, writing, peer reading

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Openness to cultural otherness
  • Tolerance of ambiguity
  • Empathy
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self

Overview

Children review their experiences and write a letter to the next generation of students

Materials

  • A blank A4 sheet for each pair of participants
  • Pictures or cards cut into two for pairing

Group size

Work in pairs

Time needed

45 minutes

Preparation

  • Think about the evaluation criteria you would like your participants to keep in mind as they write their letters

Step-by-step instructions

  • Explain why it is important to review what has been done and discussed in the previous activities or sessions. Tell children that their evaluation will take the form of a letter to the next set of participants.
  • Children form pairs or you pair them up randomly with pictures or cards with expressions on them cut into two. The two halves have to find each other in order to form a whole and complement each other. If you have an odd number of children, it is better to have a group of three rather than to have someone work alone.
  • You may provide a few ideas on what to write about and how to organize the writing into a letter. Project the relevant bullet points or write them on the board. For example:
    • aims of the activity/session/course
    • atmosphere
    • content
    • understanding of terminology
    • activities and assignments
    • timing and pacing
    • achieved learning outcomes
    • Children’s evaluation of their own progress, effort and commitment
    • Children’s plans for using the knowledge, skills and attitudes that have been developed
    • Children’s plans for using concrete activities or materials
    • problems, risks, dangers
    • general advice for future children
  • Children discuss their ideas in pairs and write their letters together to the next set of children so that they know what to expect.
  • When the time is up, the letters are passed around. If possible, everybody reads everybody else’s letters.
  • Everybody should take notes to be able to quote one or two interesting points from some of the letters.

Debriefing and Evaluation

  • A discussion follows with questions for clarification, and suggestions for action and/or improvement based on the bullet points on the board and the quotes you and children want to read out from some of the letters.
  • Make your criteria for evaluating their comments very clear and explicit.
  • Letters should be pinned to a board for future children to read and later they can actually be used as an introductory activity with the next group of children.

Tips for the teacher

  • Warn children that they can use their sense of humour but they should write letters that truly reflect their evaluation of the session and of their own learning.
  • In addition, perhaps it is useful to remind them that this should not turn into a round of compliments but into the kind of letter we all expect to receive from a critical but supportive friend or colleague.

A3@M1 #7 – ADVERTISING CHILDREN’S VOICES

Aim

  • To develop critical thinking skills about advertising and the media
  • To practice creativity and communications skills
  • To develop ideas on how to promote children’s human rights
  • To deepen understanding about human rights

Source of the activity

Derived from “COMPASITO”

Type of activity

Storytelling, drawing, writing

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Openness to cultural otherness
  • Self-efficacy
  • Civic mindedness
  • Autonomous learning skills
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills
  • Skills of listening and observing
  • Linguistic, communicative and plurilingual skills
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of language and communication
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Children develop a TV advertisement for children’s intervention of regeneration intervention at school

Materials

  • Paper and art supplies

Group size

4-24

Time needed

120-180 minutes

Preparation

  • If possible, arrange video equipment to record the advertisements

Step-by-step instructions

  • Divide children into groups of three or four. Explain that their group has been asked to advertise their intervention of regeneration at school. They will make an advertisement for television that lasts from one to three minutes that makes people aware of and/or understand that work.
  • Ask children to describe some advertisements on TV that have caught their attention. Brainstorm features of good advertisements (e.g. clever phrases, sound effects, music, humour, serious message).
  • Discuss the audience for their advertisement. Is it aimed at children, parents, teachers, the general public or all of these? Discuss ways in which the advertisement can be made attractive to their chosen audience.
  • Explain that each group should choose an aspect of the intervention they want to advertise and the audience(s) they want to address. Ask someone from each group to report their right to you, and what audience they have decided upon.
  • Once groups have chosen the work, they should develop an idea to advertise it. Encourage them to consider many different ways to present the work (e.g. a story that they act out, a song they sing, a cartoon for which they draw the storyboard). Remind them that this will be a video for TV so it should be visually interesting and have action, not just ‘talking heads’. It should not be too complex to be presented in less than three minutes.
  • Circulate among the groups to monitor their progress. Once a group has completed its advertisement, ask them to give it a title and begin to practice.
  • When all the groups have planned their advertisements, bring the whole group together to share their ideas and get feedback from others. Ask each group to explain their work, their audience, and their ideas. If they are ready, they may try to perform it as well. After each description or performance, encourage constructive suggestions and feedback, asking questions such as:
    • Will this idea appeal to the chosen audience?
    • Will it get the idea of the work across clearly?
    • Do you like about these ideas?
    • Can you offer any suggestions for improvement?
  • Give the groups time to improve and practice their advertisements.
  • Ask each group to present their advertisement and plans to each other.

Debriefing and Evaluation

  • Debrief the activity, asking questions such as:
    • Were any parts of this activity especially challenging? Especially fun?
    • Did you learn something about how advertisements are made?
    • Was it hard to think in images rather than just words?
    • Was it hard to think about how to reach a particular audience?
    • Are advertisements always positive? Why or why not?
    • What did you learn from the other storyboards?
    • Will this activity change the way you look at TV?
  • Relate the activity to human rights, asking questions such as:
    • Why did your group choose that particular aspect of the activity?
    • Why did your group choose that particular aspect of the activity?
    • What kind of reaction or action do you think your advertisement would produce?
    • Is a TV advertisement a good way to send people a message about your regeneration activity? Why or why not?
    • Did your advertisement involve other issues besides the one you focused on?
    • Who needs education about children’s human rights?

Tips for the teacher

  • This is a complex activity that may challenge children to use new skills (e.g. writing dialogue or songs, developing a story board). The teacher needs to monitor the children’s progress carefully, helping them keep on track.
  • Some groups will move faster through the process than other. If a group has completed one task, give them instructions individually for the next step. Give them plenty to time to practice and to revise after feedback.
  • Use the activity to encourage critical thinking about advertising and its purposes.
  • Use the activity to practice giving and receiving constructive criticism.

A3@M1 #5 – CVS REPORTER

Aim

  • To create a reportage about their exploration of the school spaces and memories
  • To develop collaborative skills for active participation

Source of the activity

Derived from “COMPASITO”

Type of activity

Photo reportage or other forms of reporting

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Respect
  • Civic mindedness
  • Responsibility
  • Self-efficacy
  • Autonomous learning skills
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills
  • Linguistic, communicative and plurilingual skills
  • Co-operation skills
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the self
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of language and communication
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Children report on their school (in its space-time dimensions) and its community

Materials

  • One digital or Polaroid-type camera for each group
  • Note pads and pens to take notes and identify pictures
  • Copies of maps of the community
  • Optional: Printer for printing digital photographs

Group size

1 class

Time needed

90-120 minutes
To assign before Christmas holidays and to discuss upon return from vacation, at school

Preparation

  • Make copies of maps of the school
  • Since this activity involves a critical look at school, inform in advance relevant officials
  • Try to arrange a meeting with relevant local officials to whom the children can present their results and proposals, and discuss possible changes

Step-by-step instructions

  • Discuss with children what reporters do, both in print media and TV. Explain that they themselves are going become photo reporters and take pictures of the school and its community, and interview parents, grandparents, neighbors, other children about their experience with the school.
  • Divide the children into groups of three or four. Give each group a specific assignment. For example:
    • Group A might check safety conditions inside the school (e.g. Where are fire extinguishers? Are they in working order? Are emergency doors easily accessible? Do children know what to do in case of emergency?)
    • Group B might check safety conditions outside the school, for example, related to the traffic. (e.g. Are there safe b. pavements? Safe places to cross streets? Are the streets and pavements in good repair? Are there controls on drivers’ speed?)
    • Group C might verify eating conditions at school (e.g. hygienic conditions, information on food menu, nutrition qualities of food and drinks, safety checks on water supply?)
    • Group D could concentrate on interviews to grandparents and other elders about the school.
  • Give the groups time to discuss their topic and plan how they will look for evidence. Make sure they know whom to contact to be able to enter certain areas (e.g. caretaker for school or park). They should all know how to use the camera. Each group should also have at least one child who will take notes and write up captions to identify the photographs, one to relate the photo to specific issues of the school and another who will write up their suggestions for responses.
  • Ask each group to report on their plans to the whole group. Set a specific deadline for completing their reporting assignments.
  • After groups have taken their photos, give them time to prepare a mini exhibition that will take place during the final public event. Every exhibition should include:
    • A title
    • The names of the children in the group
    • Captions for each picture, stating when and where it was taken and what it shows
    • Comments on the school spaces and its community
    • Recommendations for addressing the violations observed and commendations for good examples.

Debriefing and Evaluation

  • Debrief the activity by asking questions such as these:
    • How did you like being a reporter?
    • Was it difficult to find the examples you needed?
    • Was it difficult to ‘catch’ the situation in a photograph?
    • Was it difficult to write the captions?
    • Was it difficult to make commendations? Recommendations?
    • Did you learn anything about your community? About yourself? Did you see anything in a new way?
    • Can a camera be a useful tool to reveal situations? Can writing be useful?
    • Can you think of other tools that could reveal these situations?
    • What, if anything, does a picture add to something that is written?
  • Relate the activity to school by asking questions such as:
    • What did you learn about your school and its community?
    • What were some positive examples in the school?
    • What were some negative examples in the school?
    • Can we make concrete suggestions for improving school and its community life? To whom (e.g. school administration, parents, mayor, local council, media, teacher)?
    • The CRC guarantees children the right to express their views freely in all matters affecting them. Do you use this right? If yes, how? How could you use it most effectively? What skills do you need to do that?

Tips for the teacher

  • If children are reporting on schools or other institutions, try to obtain the approval and/or collaboration of those in charge. Their participation with the children is important in creating change.
  • Emphasize that this reporting is not just to find some problems n the school but also to evaluate what is going well.
  • Stress the importance of recognizing and commending those who are protecting and providing good health, safety and environmental standards.
  • You may need to give children basic instruction on operating a camera and tips on how to take good photographs. Be sure that all children learn how to use the camera and have an opportunity to use it.

A3@M1 #4 – DREAM SCHOOL

Aim

  • To encourage reflection about the ideal school that participants imagine for themselves and for their learners
  • To raise awareness of what we need for all students to benefit equally from school
  • To promote the development of empathy, acceptance, tolerance and readiness for action

Source of the activity

Contributed by Ildikó Lázár, inspired by ideas in activities by Aleksandra Birkova, Louise Cutajar-Davis and Pascale Mompoint-Gaillard (TASKs for democracy)

Type of activity

Imagining, writing, discussion and making a poster

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Valuing democracy
  • Openness to cultural otherness
  • Civic-mindedness
  • Skills of listening and observing
  • Empathy
  • Co-operation skills
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Students imagine and write their ideal school and they collaborate in a group to present a dream school idea, which guarantees equality for all.

Materials

  • Enough A3 or larger posters and felt-tip pens
  • Post-its

Group size

Groups of 5 children

Time needed

90 minutes

Preparation

  • Tables need to be arranged so that both small group work and whole group plenary presentations can be easily managed. If you decide to have the groups read the stories in jigsaw style, then you need enough copies of the stories in each micro-group

Step-by-step instructions

  • Tell children that in the next activity they will be encouraged to imagine the dream school they would like to go.
  • Ask children to imagine their dream school. They may want to close their eyes and think about these questions.
    • What’s your dream school like?
    • What does it look like? Which is your favourite room/space in it?
    • What traditions would you like to establish in your school?
    • What rules would you like people to observe?
    • How would you welcome newcomers at your school?
  • Tell the group to write down their own ideas individually and circle the two or three most important ones on their own lists.
  • Ask children to form micro-groups of about four or five (you can decide who is working with whom or you can group them randomly with colour cards, pens, etc.).
  • Children put together and discuss the features they collected individually to draw the dream school they would all be happy with. They take turns in presenting their most important ideas to their micro-group, one idea per person, which has to be drawn on the poster by the person sitting on his/her right. They can do two or three rounds, ensuring that every member’s most important ideas are discussed and accepted by the others in the micro-group. If one of the member’s ideas is not accepted by the micro-group, then the person has the right to present another idea. Once an idea is accepted by all members as important, the person on the right of the speaker has to draw this idea on the poster. No words can be written on the poster at this stage.
  • The micro-groups present their posters of the dream school they have created.
  • Once all the dream schools have been presented, tell the groups that unfortunately, some students are unhappy in these dream schools so the posters need to be changed to ensure that all youngsters enjoy going to this school.
  • Give out a story of conflict (see task sheet) and explain that it is a true story.
  • Ask children to complete their posters (with further drawings, or text on Post-its) to make sure their school is a dream school for everyone.
  • Ask the micro-groups to report what changes they have made to their posters.

Debriefing and Evaluation

  •  Hold a debriefing session based on some of the following questions.
    • ► Is your school a dream school for you? Is it a dream school for everyone?
    • ► What kind of experience was it to imagine your dream school?
    • ► How did you feel when you had to draw other children’s ideas on the poster?
    • ► How did you feel when you read about the unhappy children?
    • ► Has anything changed in your thinking after reading about one of them?
    • ► What did you add to the poster in the second round of drawing?
    • ► Do you see any resemblance to life at your school?

Tips for the teacher

Insist on the rules during micro-group work: members take turns to share their ideas, and it is always the person on the right of the speaker who draws on the poster if the group accepts the idea presented as important for their dream school.

Task Sheet

A3@M1 #3 – WHERE DO YOU STAND?

Aim

  • To deepen understanding of participation
  • To develop listening skills
  • To develop discussion and argumentation skills

Source of the activity

Derived from “COMPASITO”

Type of activity

Discussion with some movement

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Valuing human dignity and human rights
  • Valuing cultural diversity
  • Valuing democracy
  • Civic-mindedness

Overview

Children take a physical position in the room and then explain and support their opinions

Materials

  • Flipchart and pens
  • String or chalk
  • Paper and markers

Group size

1 class

Time needed

30-40 minutes

Preparation

  • Divide the room into two parts and put up signs AGREE and DISAGREE at either end
  • Write discussion statements on a flipchart, each on a separate page, and place them on the line in the middle of the room

Step-by-step instructions

  • Announce to the children that you are interested in their opinion on some important questions.
  • Explain that you will read a statement and individually they have to decide whether they agree or disagree with it and then stand in the part of the room where they see the relevant poster. The goal will be to convince other children to change their opinion and position.
    • No-one can speak until everyone takes a position.
    • The more strongly you agree or disagree with the statement, the further away from the centre you will stand.
    • No-one can stay on the middle line, but if you cannot decide or feel confused about a question, you can stay towards the middle on one side or the other.
  • Show the children the first statement and read it aloud. Then ask them to decide what they think and to take a position.
  • Wait until everyone has taken a position. Then ask individuals from both positions why they stood on the different sides. Let them discuss their views. Encourage many different children to express an opinion.
  • After allowing a reasonable time for discussion, invite any child who wishes to change positions. If several do, ask them what argument made them change their minds. Continue this process for all the statements.

Debriefing and Evaluation

  • Debrief the activity by asking questions such as these:
    • How did you like this exercise?
    • Was it difficult to take a position in some cases? Which ones? Did you ever change your position? What made you do so?
    • Were there some statements which were more complicated than others?
    • Are there some statements you are still uncertain about?
    • Would you like to discuss some issues further?
    • Did you learn something new from this activity? If so, what?
  • Relate the activity to the right to participation by asking questions such as these:
    • Did you see any connection among these questions?
    • Are you able to participate in decision making in your family? Your class or school? Your community? Any other situation in your life?
    • Point out that participation is an important right of every child, and read them Article 12 of the CRC. Can you imagine some new areas in which you could participate?
    • Why do you think the right to participation is important for children?

Tips for the teacher

  • Make sure that all the children, even the less outspoken ones, have a chance to express their opinion. You might call on quieter children to express their opinions.
  • Discussion time on each statement should be limited so that the activity does not become too long.
  • To keep the children alert, encourage stretching or do a quick energizer between questions.

SAMPLE STATEMENT

  • All children, even the youngest, have the right to express their opinion on matters affecting them.
  • Children have no rights to participate in family decision making. Parents know best what is best for children.
  • Only outspoken or older children can participate in decision making.
  • Every child can participate in the school parliament / student council with equal rights.
  • Children who have been in trouble with the law lose their right to participate in any decision making process.
  • Not all children have the same right to participate. Poor children cannot participate as much as others.
  • To participate at school means to talk a lot in class.
  • If one’s parents are separated or divorced, children have the right to express their views in the legal process.

A3@M1 #2 – RABBIT’S’ RIGHT

Aim

  • To introduce the CRC
  • To show children that they are instinctively aware of children’s rights
  • To connect human needs with human rights

Source of the activity

Derived from “COMPASITO”

Type of activity

Imagining, brainstorming, discussion

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Valuing human dignity and human rights
  • Valuing cultural diversity
  • Openness to cultural otherness and to other beliefs, world views and practices
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Children imagine the care a pet rabbit needs and extend that to the needs of children and their right to survive and develop

Materials

  • Chart paper and markers
  • Chart, and a copy of the CRC

Group size

1 class

Time needed

30 minutes

Preparation

  • Make a chart, and copies of the CRC

Step-by-step instructions

  • Ask the children to imagine that they have a pet rabbit to care for, and to give a name to it. They need to think about all the things it needs to be happy, safe and healthy. Ask, “What are all the things the rabbit will need?” They may suggest things such as a hutch, straw, food, water, exercise, attention, love or perhaps another rabbit for company. Write ‘RABBIT’ (or the given name) at the top of the left-hand column on a chart such as the one below, and record the children’s responses.
  • Then ask, “Who is responsible for ensuring that the rabbit gets all the things that it needs?” Note down the children’s responses, which may be that they or whoever owns the rabbit is responsible.
  • Confirm the things the rabbit needs to survive and develop, such as food, water, and a hutch. Then ask questions such as these:
    • If the rabbit really needs these things to survive, then should the rabbit have a right to them?
    • Who is responsible for ensuring that the rabbit’s rights to these things are met?
  • Then write ‘CHILDREN’ at the top of the right-hand column and ask the group to brainstorm: “What are the things that children need to develop and have for a happy, safe and healthy life?” List the children’s responses, helping to elicit such things as home, food, water, family, friends, toys, education, love and attention.
  • Ask, “Who is responsible for ensuring that children get all the things they need to be happy, safe and healthy?” Encourage answers such as adults, parents, family, and caregivers.
  • Ask questions such as these to expand the focus of children’s rights, adding additional needs to the chart:
    • What do children need to be protected, to survive, to develop and to participate?
    • If children need these things, then should children have a right to them?
    • Who is responsible for ensuring that children have these rights?
  • Ask the group if they have ever heard of the CRC. Give them copies of the child-friendly version or use a poster version. Explain that this document states the things to which every child in the world has a right.

Debriefing and Evaluation

Invite the children to compare their list on the chart with those in the CRC.

  • Point out that they have created a list of children’s rights. Ask questions such as these:
    • What needs did you name that are also in the CRC? Mark these on the chart with a star.
    • Why do you think you were able to think of so many of the rights by yourself?
  • Point out that the group knew from the beginning what children needed to develop and grow, without adults having to tell them. They are experts on their own lives! Explain that the CRC is there to support children’s rights, to protect them, to provide for them and to ensure that they can participate in the world around them.

Tips for the teacher

  • Because this activity requires no reading skills, it can be run with very young children. However, they only need to have the idea of ‘rights’ defined, in simple terms. The CRC can be introduced later.
  • You could choose to replace ‘rabbit’ with any other household pet.
  • Variations: If appropriate to the group, you might conclude by reading the child-friendly CRC aloud, with each child reading a different article.
  • Adaptation for Older Children: When comparing the children’s list and the CRC, invite discussion of what they omitted, asking questions such as these:
    • Are there other needs and rights in the CRC that were not on your list?
    • Why do you think they are in the CRC?
    • Why do you think you might have thought of these needs and rights?

SAMPLE CHART

RABBIT CHILDREN
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A3@M1 #1 – ZABDERFILIO

Aim

  • To discuss the concept of ‘All Different – All Equal’
  • To reflect on the meaning of tolerance and diversity
  • To discuss violence and conflict management
  • To understand the principle of universality

Source of the activity

Derived from “COMPASITO”

Type of activity

Storytelling, reflective activity

Competences targeted by the activity

  • Valuing human dignity and human rights
  • Valuing cultural diversity
  • Openness to cultural otherness and to other beliefs, world views and practices
  • Tolerance of ambiguity
  • Conflict resolution skills
  • Knowledge and critical understanding of the world

Overview

Children watch a puppet show and interact with the characters

Materials

  • A puppet theatre or similar arrangements
  • Different animal puppets, a hunter puppet, a presenter puppet, and a Zabderfilio puppet, such as in the handout

Group size

1 class

Time needed

35 minutes

Preparation

  • Practise the puppet show beforehand
  • Make a puppet to represent Zabderfilio: an animal that has characteristics of different animals (or you can use the handout)

Step-by-step instructions

  • Gather the children in front of the puppet theatre. Explain that they have to be silent and stay in their seats when the puppet show is running. They should only speak when the characters ask them questions and nobody should try to touch them.
  • Run the puppet show. Ask the children questions regularly to keep their attention and to work towards the learning objectives.

Debriefing and Evaluation

  • Debrief the activity by asking questions such as these:
    • How do you feel about the story?
    • What happened during the story?
    • What animal do you like the most? The least? Why?
    • Were the other animals fair towards Zabderfilio?
    • Why did they act as they did?
    • Why do you think the other animals finally became friends with Zabderfilio? Because he was the strongest? The best looking? Or because he was brave and generous? Or a mixture of different talents?
  • Relate the activity to human rights by asking questions such as these:
    • Have you ever seen anyone treated the way the animals first treated Zabderfilio?
    • Why does this happen in real life?
    • What animal do you like the most? The least? Why?
    • Are we all the same and still different? In what ways are we all alike? And what makes us different?
    • What can we do to avoid some children feeling as Zabderfilio did when no-one would be his friend?

Tips for the teacher

Instead of having a real puppet theatre,

  • Use a blanket to sit behind.
  • Use whatever animal puppets you have available. If you do not have the necessary puppets, make the puppets using cut-out cardboard drawings or old socks.
  • Adapt your Zabderfilio to fit your imagination. He might have the ears of a rabbit, the horn of a rhino, the nose and whiskers of a mouse, the mane of a lion, the pouch of a kangaroo or any other combination that fits your story. In any case, he should look weird and have at least a conspicuous nose, a loud voice and the ability to move silently. You can also adapt the story to fit any puppet you may have.
  • With larger groups, have a second teacher to help with the process of question and answer between the group and the puppets.

SCENARIO

Introduction: (made by a ‘presenter puppet’ who is not part of the story)

Presenter Puppet: Hello, ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls. I’m happy to see that everybody is ready to listen and watch today’s special show! Well, I can tell you already a little bit of the mystery of today. It all takes place in the world of the animals. And in that world, just like ours, not everything is beautiful and not everything is ugly, not everything is normal and not everything is weird. But – there are always surprises! And this story is about one of these surprises. It is the story of a very special animal called Zabderfilio. Watch and listen carefully. Please stay where you are, otherwise the animals might run away and we will never know what happens at the end of the story. See you later!

THE STORY

Summary: Zabderfilio meets different existing animals one by one. Each of them considers Zabderfilio a very strange animal. Zabderfilio is looking for friends but none of the animals want to be his friend because he is … just weird! Below is an example of one of his encounters:

Giraffe: (Comes on the stage and talks to the children) Hello, everybody. Do you know who I am?

(Audience: You’re a giraffe.)

Giraffe: How do you know? Am I wearing a nametag somewhere?

(Audience: Because of your long neck, your colours…)

Giraffe: Yes, you are all right. And I have the longest neck of all the animals in the world. I can see a long way, and I can eat from high trees without any great effort!

(Zabderfilio comes on stage)

Zabderfilio: (Very friendly and eager) Hello!

Giraffe: WOOEEEHAAA … you scared me there for a second, sneaking up to me like this. But wait a minute, who are you?

Zabderfilio: I am Zabderfilio.

Giraffe: Zabberbadderdiloooo-what??

Zabderfilio: My name is Zabderfilio and I’m looking for friends. Do you want to be my friend?

Giraffe: Er, um… I don’t know. You look very strange to me! You are not a mouse, not a lion, not a kangoroo, but you look like all of them. All my friends are one thing or the other and not a mix like you! Excuse me, but I have to go see my friends! Tee hee hee, you are really strange and ugly!

Zabderfilio: (With hurt feelings) But, but – wait a second…

(Giraffe has already disappeared and Zabderfilio talks now to the audience)

Zabderfilio: This makes me sad. Why didn’t Giraffe wanted to be my friend? Well, let me walk a little bit longer in the forest and see if I meet any other animals to play with.

None of the animals Zabderfilio meets wants to be his friend. After several encounters, suddenly, a hunter comes on stage. He is hunting animals. Each time one of the animals comes on stage, the hunter tries to grab it, but they all run away, screaming for help.

Then the hunter disappears from the stage, looking in the forest for the animals, and Zabderfilio reappears. He asks the audience what all this noise was about.

After the audience explains the situation, Zabderfilio uses his nose of a mouse to smell the hunter (Aha, with my keen nose I smell a hunter nearby!), his feet of a cat to walk without any noise (I think I can use my cat feet to sneak up on him!) and his lion scream to scare the hunter away (And now I use my huge voice to roar like a lion and frighten him away. ROAR!).

After this heroic deed, the other animals come closer and apologize for their nasty behaviour. They all ask him to be their friend, and Zabderfilio gladly accepts. All the animals say goodbye to the audience and the ‘presenting–puppet’ appears to make the final comments.

CONCLUSION

Presenter Puppet: Well, boys and girls, ladies and gentlemen. That was the story of Zabderfilio. Did you enjoy it?

He certainly was a funny looking beast! But he was able to help his friends because he combined so many different parts.

Next time you see someone who looks a little unusual, I hope you think of Zabderfilio – that person may have talents you never dreamed of and make a wonderful friend.

HANDOUT: EXAMPLE OF ZABDERFILIO

A15@M2 – FINAL PLENARY MEETING WITH KC CHILDREN

Aim

  • To reflect on the learning experience with children
  • To collect children’s suggestions about the Curriculum revision

Type of activity

Discussion

Overview

Materials

None

Group size

2 classes

Time needed

60 minutes

Preparation

None

Step-by-step instructions

  • Ask the children for their opinion about the Curriculum

Debriefing and Evaluation

Debrief the activity with “The Telegraph”.

Tips for the teacher

(Collecting suggestions from Core Teachers)

A14@M2 – FINAL PLENARY MEETING WITH KC PARENTS

Aim

  • To discuss the whole process with children’s parents

Type of activity

Discussion

Overview

Materials

None

Group size

Parents of children of the two classes involved in the Curriculum

Time needed

45 minutes

Preparation

None

Step-by-step instructions

  • Ask the parents about their experience of the curriculum and their opinion about their kids’ involvement

Debriefing and Evaluation

Debrief the activity with “The Telegraph”.

Tips for the teacher

(Collecting suggestions from Core Teachers)

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.